Hiroshima: Ground Zero 1945

After the United States detonated an atomic bomb at Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, the U.S. government restricted the circulation of images of the bomb's deadly effect. President Truman dispatched some 1,150 military personnel and civilians, including photographers, to record the destruction as part of the United States Strategic Bombing Survey. The goal of the Survey's Physical Damage Division was to photograph and analyze methodically the impact of the atomic bomb on various building materials surrounding the blast site, designated "Ground Zero." The haunting, once-classified images of absence and annihilation formed the basis for civil defense architecture in the United States. This exhibition includes 62 prints drawn from a unique archive of more than 700 photographs in the collection of the International Center of Photography. The exhibition is organized Erin Barnett, Assistant Curator of Collections

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One of the most highly regarded books of its kind, On Photography first appeared in 1977 and is described by its author as “a progress of essays about the meaning and career of photographs.” It begins with the famous “In Plato’s Cave”essay, then offers five other prose meditations on this topic, and concludes with a fascinating and far-reaching “Brief Anthology of Quotations.”

In How to Read a Photograph: Lessons from Master Photographers, Ian Jeffrey presents a history of photography, starting with the first portraits and landscapes of the 1840s and traveling up through the modern era. Along the way, he discusses major advancements in the field and the social and cultural settings that influenced its development as an art form. 


Ian Jeffrey is a well-known art historian and the author of several books on photogrpahy. Max Kozloff, who contributes to the foreword, is the former editor of Artforum, a leading photography critic, and the author of numerous books on the subject. 

This anthology gathers into a single volume 30 essays which embody the history of photography. Contributors include: Niepce, Daguerre, Fox Talbot, Poe, Baudelaire, Emerson, Hine, Steiglitz, Weston, Abbott, Barthes, and others. Their writings encompass the technical origin and development of the medium, the aesthetic perspective of many influential photographers, and the evolution of critical analysis of the photographic image and its place in American cultural history. 


Edited by Alan Trachtenberg, Professor of English/American Studies at Yale University 


Headnotes by Amy Meyers. 

In the summer of 1936, James Agee and Walker Evans set out on assignment for Fortune magazine to explore the daily lives of sharecroppers in the South. Their journey would prove an extraordinary collaboration and a watershed literary event when in 1941 Let Us Now Praise Famous Men was first published to enormous critical acclaim. This unsparing record of place, of the people who shaped the land and the rhythm of their lives was called intensely moving and unrelentingly honest, and is "renowned for its fusion of social conscience and artistic radicality" (New York Times). Today it stands as a poetic tract of its time, recognized by the New York Publicy Library as one of the most influential books of the twentieth century. With an elegant new design as well as a sixty-four-page photographic prologue of Evans's classic images, reproduced from archival negatives, this sixtieth-anniversary edition reintroduces the legendary author and photographer to a new generation. 

In paperback for the first time, Slightly Out of Focus is the classic World War II memoir of one of the most gifted photographers who ever lived. Robert Capa arrived in Europe on a photojournalism assignment in 1941, and for the next four years he traveled throughout the embattled continent, documenting the war from the perspective of the men and women of the Allied Forces who befriended, amused, and captivated him along the way. His photographs are treasures, and his writing is by turns riotously funny and deeply moving. This edition includes more than one hundred photographs, notably Capa's defining images of the Nomrandy landing. Charming and profound, Slightly Out of Focus is a masterpiece of words and photographs. 


Foreword by Cornell Capa. Introduction by Richard Whelan 

The Photographs Not Taken is a collection of essays by photographers about the times they didn’t use their camera. I have asked the photographers to abandon the conventional tools needed to make a photograph, and, instead, make one using words to describe the memories and experiences that didn’t go through the camera lens. Here, the process of making a photograph has been reversed. Instead of looking out into the world through a camera lens, these essays allow us to look directly into the photographer’s mind and eye and focus on where the photographs come from in their barest and most primitive form. These mental negatives depict the unedited world and the moments of life that do not exist in a single frame. - Will Steacy 

The Photographs Not Taken features contributions by: Dave Anderson, Timothy Archibald, Roger Ballen, Thomas Bangsted, Juliana Beasley, Nina Berman, Elinor Carucci, Kelli Connell, Paul D'Amato, Tim Davis, KayLynn Deveney, Doug Dubois, Rian Dundon, Amy Elkins, Jim Goldberg, Emmet Gowin, Gregory Halpern, Tim Hetherington, Todd Hido, Rob Hornstra, Eirik Johnson, Chris Jordan, Nadav Kander, Ed Kashi, Misty Keasler, Lisa Kereszi, Erika Larsen, Shane Lavalette, Deana Lawson, Joshua Lutz, David Maisel, Mary Ellen Mark, Laura McPhee, Michael Meads, Andrew Moore, Richard Mosse, Zwelethu Mthethwa, Laurel Nakadate, Ed Panar, Christian Patterson, Andrew Phelps, Sylvia Plachy, Mark Power, Peter Riesett, Simon Roberts, Joseph Rodriguez, Stefan Ruiz, Matt Salacuse, Alessandra Sanguinetti, Aaron Schuman, Jamel Shabazz, Alec Soth, Amy Stein, Mark Steinmetz, Joni Sternbach, Hank Willis Thomas, Brian Ulrich, Peter Van Agtmael, Massimo Vitali, Hiroshi Watanabe, Alex Webb, and Rebecca Norris Webb.


Edited by Will Steacy. Introduction by Lyle Rexer.

Japanese photography has attracted much attention beyond its native shores, especially in recent years. Far less familiar are the photographers' extensive and revealing writings, which not only illuminate how their photography should be viewed and understood but also articulate certain core concepts that make Japanese photography unique. These incisive, provocative text, which are made available in this anthology for the first time in English, are essential to any comprehensive discussion of Japanese photography from the 1950s to now. 


Edited by Ivan Vartanian. Introduction by Anne Wilkes Tucker. Epilogue by Takashi Homma. 

Films is Paul Graham's eulogy to the physical material of photography: Film.


The 20th century's greatest medium has undergone a catastrophic decline over the past decade as digital cameras have swept aside the traditional process of taking photographs. Film has died: Kodacolor, Fujicolor, Tri-X, Kodachrome, Ektacolor – all evocative names for any photographer – are now gone or fading fast. Yet this magical material is a true product of both science: silver salts suspended in gelatin emulsion on celluloid base, and magical alchemy: it could capture light. Film became the defining material of 20th century creativity, and is ubiquitous to every great artist of photography and film making. While examining his past 30 years of work for the 2009 survey exhibition and book, Graham became enamoured with the material of his craft, and began to reflect upon the physical substance by which he, and all photographers, made their images. Besides scanning his images for the survey, he also scanned the blank film ends and unexposed frames from each body of work to gather an alternative survey, a 'negative retrospective' of his practice. What first appears to be abstract dots, blobs or colour forms, are in fact just greatly magnified images of the raw film emulsion– the color dyes clouds formed in the exposure and development of film. These images are not abstract at all, but extreme close-ups of the film's structure – the red, green and blue dyes that form film emulsion, which comprise each and every celluloid image in existence. Their beauteous complication, the wonder of their granular form, irrespective of what they describe, is given here for us to enjoy.


Graham presents us a timely tribute to the passing of film. The grains, color dyes and black and white crystals, make images of beauty, simplicity and scientific record. Part wistful homage, part farewell, part visual wonder, Films is a book for anyone who engaged with photographic material in the 20th century.

I found an address book on the Rue des Martyrs . . . I will contact the people whose names are noted down. I will tell them, “I found an address book on the street by chance. Your number was in it. I’d like to meet you.” . . . Thus, I will get to know this man through his friends and acquaintances. I will try to discover who he is without ever meeting him.


—from The Address Book by Sophie Calle


Having found a lost address book on the street in Paris, artist Sophie Calle copied the pages before returning it anonymously to its owner. She then began contacting the people—in essence, following him through the map of his family, friends, lovers, and acquaintances.


Calle’s written accounts of these encounters—juxtaposed with her photographs—originally appeared as serial in the French newspaper Libération over the course of one month in 1983. Now, The Address Book, a key and controversial work in Calle’s oeuvre, is being published for the first time in its entirety in English as a beautiful trade edition artist’s book, designed in collaboration with the artist.


Part conceptual art, part character study, part confession, part essay, The Address Book is, above all, a prism through which desire and the elusory, persona and identity, the private and the public, knowledge and the unknown are refracted in luminous and provocative ways.

Over the past ten years, Cass Bird (born 1974) has established herself as one of the foremost portraitists of contemporary America. Her photographs of young women and men casually draw attention to the fluid expression of gender roles and androgyny in today's youth culture, and to what she has described as "the convergence of alternative lifestyles with accepted conceptions of motherhood, nurturing and family." In the summers of 2009 and 2010, Bird traveled to Sassafrass, Tennessee, with a group of young women, a wardrobe of diaphanous dresses and a camera. These women--studio assistants, friends, or women cast from the streets of New York--had been selected by Bird for their ease with their sexual identities, but also for their relative awkwardness in front of the lens. The result was Rewilding, a joyous portrait of modern femininity and a frolicking celebration of women's camaraderie.


Foreword by Sally Singer
Introduction by Jack Halberstam


 

This is the first book of Joel Sternfeld’s largely unseen early color photographs. In 1969 Sternfeld began working with a 35 mm camera and Kodachrome film, and First Pictures contains works from this time until 1980. Here Sternfeld develops traits that appear in his mature work: irony, a politicised view of America, concern for the social condition. But there are also pictures that bear little relation to his later work: colour arrangements that parallel those of Eggleston, as well as street photography which Sternfeld ceased making in 1976. The photographs in First Pictures were made at a time when color photography was struggling to assert itself against the authoritative black and white tradition, making this book a revelation both in Sternfeld’s oeuvre and in the history of contemporary photography.

 

Clothbound hardcover, 11.75" x 9.75", 326 pages
Published by Steidl, 2012

 

copy for sale was used for display

Few artists have changed the manner in which photographic images are made, read, and received over the past two decades as dramatically as German photographer Wolfgang Tillmans. His ability to calculatedly create unguarded and immediate images, combined with his innovative exhibition strategies, has made him one of the most renowned and revolutionary artists of the past twenty years. 


This catalogue accompanies Tillmans's first retrospective exhibition in the Untied States and covers his interests in the alchemy of light, our "being-in-the-world," and the potent effects of his portraits, abstractions, and structural and sculptural motifs. This volume also presents some of the most richly evocative and stylishly intimate photographs to be created in our time. 


Essays by Julie Ault, Daniel Birnbaum, Russell Ferguson, Dominic Molon, Lane Relyea, and Mark Wigley. 

This monograph by the award-winning Dutch-born photographer Sassen features photographs from throughout West and East Africa. Sassen's overriding theme is parasomnia, a sleep disorder involving strange movements, behaviours, emotions, and dreams. The otherworldly feel of these photographs, involving both human and inanimate subjects, aptly conveys an altered-consciousness point of view - one that is at home in the pages of a fashion magazine, newspaper, or a modern art gallery.


Short story by Moses Isegawa. 

Ansel Adams (1902-1984) produced some of this century's truly memorable photographic images and helped nurture the art of photography through his creative innovations and peerless technical mastery. 


The Negative - the second volume in Adams' celebrated series of books on phtoographyic techniques- has taught generations of phtoographers how to use film and the film development process creatively. This handbook distills the knowledge gained through a lifetime on photography and remains as vital today as when it was first published. 


Anchored by a detailed discussion of Adams' Zone System aand his seminal concept of visualization, The Negative covers artificial and natural light, film, and exposure, and darkroom equipment and techniques. Numerous examples of Adams' work clarify the principles discussed. Beautifully illustrated with photographs by Adams as well as instructive line drawings, this classic manual can dramatically improve your photography. 

The Camera - the first volume in Adams' celebrated series of books on photographic techniques - has taught generations of phtoographers how to harness the camera's artistic potential. This handbook distills the knowledge gained through a lifetime in photogrpahy and remains as vital today as when it was first published. 


Along with visualization, image management, Adams' fmaous Zone System, and other keys to photographic artistry, The Camera covers 35mm, medium-format, and large-format view cameras and offers detailed advice on camera components such as lenses, shutters, and light meters. Beautifully illustrated with photographs by Ansel Adams as well as instructive line drawings, this classic manual belongs on every serious photographer's bookshelf. 

The most comprehensive, accessible, and completely up-to-date guide available for today’s photographer: whether beginner or advanced, using a film camera or digital.

Award-winning photographer Tom Ang provides a thorough, explicitly detailed bottom-to-top understanding of modern photography, explaining all the techniques that will help anyone who uses a camera—in a professional capacity or as a snapshot shooter—improve the quality of his or her photographs. Here is everything you need to know: from the most practical advice (the fundamental facts about light sources) to the most sophisticated nuances (how light is measured through photometry), from the basics of the camera (which button controls which function) to the finer points of framing with an LCD viewfinder, featuring a selection of Ang’s most inspiring images. For users of film cameras, Ang explains the differences between types of film and details the various methods of processing and darkroom techniques.

Ang delves into the development and transformation of photography by digital techniques. For the digital-camera contingent, there’s a specificity of previously unavailable information about the cameras and about processing, digitizing, and outputting the images. Ang also discusses subjects usually ignored in manuals but of interest to all photographers, including critical theory, the presentation of images, the function of the human eye in the perception of images, and ethical and copyright issues.

One of the world’s leading fashion magazines, will celebrate its 40th anniversary with this volume—a collection of the most influential and iconic features and photos culled from its first four decades. is renowned for its groundbreaking, provocative, often controversial fashion stories by such photographers as Steven Klein, Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott, Bruce Weber, Mario Sorrenti, Tim Walker, Juergen Teller, and Paolo Roversi, among many others, the best of which fill these pages.


Divided into three sections—Who, Where, and Wow—this volume shows why W’s unique blend of unparalleled access, cultural smarts, and visual panache has always kept it at the forefront of not only the world of fashion, but also in art, design, style, beauty, celebrity, and society. Appearing in these pages are many of the world’s most talented, beautiful, and accomplished from a vast array of fields, including Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt, Madonna, Damien Hirst, Alexander McQueen, Daphne Guinness, Beyoncé, Karl Lagerfeld, Kate Moss, the Beckhams, Tilda Swinton, and Jackie Kennedy.


In addition to a foreword by the book’s editor, Stefano Tonchi, W: The First 40 Years also includes newly commissioned essays from writers Lynn Hirschberg, Marian McEvoy, and Vince Aletti. Longtime contributor Christopher Bagley has edited the text and written revealing captions that draw upon the magazine’s most memorable interviews and reporting.

Artists featured include those who specifically address issues of race in their work as well as those who may not have intended to address racial issues but whose work nonetheless raises them. They include: Jessica Craig-Martin, Chester Higgins, Nikki Lee, Catherine Opie, Lorna Simpson, Vanessa Beecroft, Simon Johan, Carrie Mae Weems, Nancy Burson, Garry Winogrand, Pedro Meyer, Robert Misrach, Lewis Hine, Lee Friedlander, John Baldessari, Ansel Adams, Man Ray, F. Holland Day and Thomas Eakins.


Edited by Coco Fusco and Brian Wallis 


Remaining copies have shelf wear on the dust jacket. Contents remain in good condition.

Pro photographer Rob Sheppard starts with the basics–composition, light, and perspective–and describes how to connect with your scene. He covers all the key camera features that affect your image, including how changing focal lengths alters your perspective and the aperture’s direct correlation with depth of field. Once you’ve captured those shots, Rob takes you through simple post-processing steps in Lightroom, Photoshop, and Photoshop Elements.

This guide is for beginning-to-intermediate digital photographers to understand the basics and bring their own unique artistic expression to landscapes and outdoor shooting. Beautifully illustrated with large and compelling photos, this book teaches you how to take control of your photography to get the image you want every time you pick up the camera.

The Print - the third volume in Adams' celebrated series of books on photographic techniques- has taught generations of phtoogrpahers how to explore the artistic possiblilites of printmaking. This handbook distills the knowledge gained through a lifetime in photgoraphy and remains as vital today as when it was first published. 


The Print takes you step-by-step from desigining and furnishing a darkroom to mounting and dispalying your photographs, from making your first print to mastering advanced techniques, such as developer modifications, toning and bleaching, and burning and dodging. Filled with indispensable darkroom techniques and tips, this amply illustrated guide shows how print-making - the clumination of photography's creative process - can be used expressively to enhance an image.