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Teen Academy

  • © Jacqueline Paredes
    © Jacqueline Paredes
  • © Sarah Hull
    © Sarah Hull
  • © Blaine Davis
    © Blaine Davis
  • Steven Sachs
    © Steven Sachs
  • 2010 Teen Academy Imagemakers at the ICP Library
    © Deirdre Donohue
  • Mock job assignment with guest Andre Lambertson
    Mock job assignment with guest Andre Lambertson
    © Angelica Marshall
  • Teen Academy Internship Exhibition Opening © Lavonne Hall
    Teen Academy Internship Exhibition Opening
    © Lavonne Hall

ICP's Teen Academy program offers a range of opportunities for teenagers to develop their knowledge of photography. In-class sessions range from ten-week classes to a yearlong intensive program focusing on professional applications.

"What being a photographer means to me is being lucky enough to have the understanding of a medium which allows me to create. What I learned is within me, a little inner revolution. I learned things about myself, about the world, about the people I know, about people I don’t know, about the most familiar and unfamiliar places. I most importantly learned that with dedication and perseverance, I, and anyone, can do anything."

—Yasemin, Imagemakers

Winter 2015

Winter Registration Begins Wednesday, December 3 at 11 am.

Photography I in Black-and-White: Camera and Darkroom

January 24–March 28 | Saturday 11am2pm | $700 + $85 feeBrenna McLaughlin
January 24–March 28 | Saturday 3–6 pm | $700 + $85 feeBlake Ogden
January 29–April 2 | Thursday 4–6:30 pm + Field Trip TBA | $700 + $85 fee | Chantal Heijnen
Teenagers are invited to learn the basics of black-and-white photography. Students make exposures with a 35mm camera, process film, and create prints in ICP's darkrooms. During field trips and shooting assignments, students expand their understanding of the technical and aesthetic possibilities of photography. Classes also include discussions on the work of historical and contemporary photographers, as well as darkroom time, visual presentations, photographic and writing assignments, critiques, a guest artist visit, and a field trip. By the end of the course, students will have developed a portfolio of prints and an artist's statement. The course culminates in a final presentation for family and friends.

Photography I in Color: Color Film and Darkroom*

January 24–March 28 | Saturday 2–5 pm | $700 + $55 fee | Lesly Deschler-Canossi
January 25–March 29 | Sunday 2–5 pm | $700 + $55 fee | Sarah Warshaw
Explore color film and darkroom photography. Students learn to make exposures with a 35mm camera and create color prints in ICP's darkrooms. Using negatives, students refine their printing skills and are able to work with speed and consistency on ICP’s computerized Kreonite print processor. Classes include discussions on historical and contemporary photographers working in color. Through assignments, students expand their understanding of the technical and aesthetic possibilities of color film photography. The curriculum includes: darkroom time, visual presentations, photographic and writing assignments, discussions, critiques, a guest artist visit, and a field trip. By the end of the course, students will have developed a portfolio of prints and an artist's statement. The course culminates in a final presentation for family and friends. This introductory color printing course is designed for students who have previous experience with black-and-white darkroom techniques.

Photography II in Black-and-White: Lighting for Portraiture*

January 25–March 29 | Sunday 11 am–2 pm | $700 + $55 feeBayeté Ross Smith
In this course designed for more advanced teen photographers, students use portraiture as an entry point for understanding the technical and aesthetic components of lighting. This course provides an in-depth exploration of metering and exposure while students study natural and artificial lighting techniques for the black-and-white portrait. Through technical exercises, students learn the tools needed to control and manipulate light in order to achieve both practical and artistic effects. Students photograph themselves, each other, family members, and strangers—spontaneously in the neighborhood, staged at home, and more formally in the studio. The curriculum includes: darkroom time, visual presentations, photographic and writing assignments, discussions, critiques, a guest artist visit, and a field trip. By the end of the course, students will have developed a portfolio of prints and an artist’s statement. The course will culminate in a final presentation for family and friends..

Photography II in Black-and-White: Exploring Self-Portraiture*

January 25–March 29 | Sunday 3–6 pm | $700 + $55 feeJaime Schlesinger
Ever since photography was invented, self-portraiture has been widely explored. Whether documenting one's life experience, creating a performance for the camera, or using oneself as a model to articulate larger social concerns, self-portraiture can be both the most accessible and most challenging subject for a photographer. In this class, students will explore their own ideas, messages, and stories, and determine how to express them through images. Through photographic and writing assignments, students will discover the varied ways in which the photographer can approach and interpret this genre. The curriculum includes: darkroom time, visual presentations, photographic and writing assignments, discussions, critiques, a guest artist visit, and a field trip. By the end of the course, students will have developed a portfolio of prints and an artist’s statement. The course will culminate in a final presentation for family and friends.

*Prerequisite: Photo I in Black-and-White as approved by Community Programs staff.

Teen Academy Scholarships are available for all courses. If you are in need of financial assistance, download a scholarship application.

 

Teen Foto Fridays

Teen Foto Fridays invites high school students from across ICP Community Programs to participate in free open labs, technical workshops, and college portfolio preparation. The schedule for Teen Foto Fridays is available at the start of each Teen Academy semester.

These programs are made possible with generous support from the William Randolph Hearst Foundation, Surdna Foundation, Altman Foundation, The Norman and Heewon Cerk Gift Fund, The Chervenak-Nunnalle Foundation, Susan and Thomas Dunn, Felicia Anastasia and Sy Jacobs Charitable Foundation, Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation, Joy of Giving Something, Inc., and by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.
DCA