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Past Exhibition

  • André Kertész
    Clock of the Académie Française, Paris, 1932
    © Estate of André Kertész/Higher Pictures
    The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles
  • André Kertész
    Lion and Shadow, 1949
    © Estate of André Kertész and the Jeu de Paume/French Ministry for Culture and Communication
    National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of The André and Elizabeth Kertész Foundation
  • André Kertész
    Satiric Dancer, 1926
    © Estate of André Kertész and the Jeu de Paume/French Ministry for Culture and Communication
    Nicholas Pritzker, courtesy Edwynn Houk Gallery, New York
  • André Kertész
    Meudon, 1928
    © Estate of André Kertész and the Jeu de Paume/French Ministry for Culture and Communication
    Collection Soizic Audouard, Paris
  • André Kertész
    Poughkeepsie, New York, 1937
    © Estate of André Kertész and the Jeu de Paume/French Ministry for Culture and Communication
    Lent by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Ford Motor Company Collection, Gift of Ford Motor Company and John C. Waddell

André Kertész

SEPTEMBER 16–NOVEMBER 27, 2005

André Kertész (1894–1985) has been hailed as one of the most important photographers of the twentieth century. Working intuitively, he captured the poetry of modern urban life with its quiet, often overlooked incidents and odd, occasionally comic, or even bizarre juxtapositions. He endeavored "to give meaning to everything" about him with his camera, "to make photographs as by reflection in a mirror, unmanipulated and direct as in life." Combining this seemingly artless spontaneity wit